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Our key word we're looking at today in science is pitch. What is pitch? it's basically how high or low a sound is. Do you remember when we found out how sounds are made using vibrations - the bigger the vibration, the louder the volume? Different pitches are caused by how fast the object vibrates. Take a look at this BBC bitesize clip and see if you can fill in the activity at the bottom:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zgffr82/articles/z3j3jty

 

We also have pitch to thank for musical instruments - take a look at this BBC clip to see how we have science to thank for any piece of music you've ever enjoyed, from Beethoven to the Macarena;

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/ztptsbk

 

As you've seen, the different thicknesses or lengths of the guitar strings result in different pitches when they vibrate. Can you have a guess at what we're doing? That's right, making our own instruments! There are a few ways you can do this depending on what you have around the house.

 

One way is making guitars with different thicknesses (or lengths) of elastic bands so that when you pluck the elastic bands they have a different pitch, as demonstrated by Connor last year (sorry Connor!);

 

We followed this guide: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tune-up-your-rubber-band-guitar/

 

If you've no rubber bands, no problem - it's pan pipe time. As demonstrated by Tia from last, last year (sorry Tia!) you can cut straws down to different lengths, stick them together and when you blow through them the different lengths of the straws with vibrate slowly for the long ones and quickly for the shorter ones, resulting in different pitches.

We followed this easy guide. https://www.kidspot.com.au/things-to-do/activity-articles/make-a-straw-flute/news-story/c76ad8388ccb866800f9539f96673b13

 

No straws or elastic bands? No problem! You can still explore the same principles of science using a cardboard tube to make a flute; https://www.koolkidscrafts.com/how-to-make-a-flute.html

 

Still no luck? If you've any glass bottles or jars you can fill them with water (make sure you've an adult to help you with the glass bottles, don't risk dropping them and hurting yourself). If you haven't glass bottles, you can use plastic ones and blow into them like this scientist shows you at 2:05 on the video below;

See what instruments you can come up with and send me pictures of Year 4's homemade orchestra!

 

 

Imagine It - Build a water bottle xylophone

Chief Scientist Carl Nelson adds water to some glass bottles to create a bottle xylophone you can play music on. Imagination Station, Toledo's hands-on scien...

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